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The 3 Types of Corners on a Race Track and How to Approach Them

A driver’s main objective is to complete the lap in the shortest amount of time when approaching a race circuit.


Most race tracks have more straightaway driving than cornering, so there is more time to gain or lose cornering than driving straight. The driver’s objective is to spend as little time cornering as possible.


After reviewing each type of turn you may face on the track, let’s talk about how to approach each one.


1. Type A Corners


These corners are best described as tight corners or those with a relatively small radius. These corners are usually preceded by a straightaway, allowing a driver to make up the time they are going to lose by not being able to travel as fast through the turn as normal.


Approach


Approach type A turns with your braking to a minimum until the last part of the turn. This will allow you to continue accelerating longer and hug the track more closely, making it easier to stay on the racing line and get a good exit out of turn.


If you are entering a long, slow type A corner and you are within six feet or less of the car in front of you and have been for the straightaway duration, you can use the drafting technique to increase your speed through the turn.


The increased air pressure created by the front vehicle means that you have less air pushing against you, reducing drag and allowing you to travel faster.


2. Type B Corners


Type B corners are defined as medium angles. These corners are usually preceded by a straightaway and are of medium length.


Approach


Approach type B turns by braking to a point where you are comfortable. Whether this is a high-speed or low-speed turn will determine how much braking you do.


As you approach, start your turn and remain in a medium gear as you are late into the curve.


As you exit the turn, accelerate out of turn, but keep your speed below the vehicle’s red line, as you will be on a straightaway immediately after the turn.


3. Type C Corners


This is the most common type of corner that race tracks have. Type C turns are described as wide and are generally the longest type of turn that a race track will have.


Approach


Approach type C turns by braking to a point where you are comfortable. Whether this is a high-speed or low-speed turn will determine how much braking you do.


As you approach, start your turn a little deeper in the turn than you do for other turns. As you exit the turn, accelerate out of turn, but keep your speed below the vehicle’s red line, as you will be on a straightaway immediately after the turn.


If you are entering a long, wide type C corner and you are within six feet or less of the car in front of you and have been for the straightaway duration, you can use the drafting technique to increase your speed through the turn.


Conclusion


The approach to a corner is not that different from the approach to any other kind of race. The more you do it, the better you will get. Make sure that you think about the best speed, the best exit out of turn, and the best way to stay on the racetrack.


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